Machine and Process Management

How “Intelligent Pumping” strategies address disruptive trends in Water Wastewater Industry

Global water shortages, the growth in urban population, environmental regulations, and process inefficiencies are all contributing to a crisis in the water-wastewater industry. Let’s discuss, how migration to a new “intelligent pumping” approach can help water-wastewater organizations address these challenges.

Urbanization:

According to the United Nations, the urban population of the world is forecast to grow to 6.3 billion people in 2050, from 3.4 billion in 2009. This increase in water shortage due to urbanization is resulting  in more water efficient systems and new concepts like water harvesting and desalination plants along with  increased infrastructure for drinking water, waste water management and drainage systems.

Energy crisis:

We understand that energy is required for the systems that lift, move, process and treat the water. It is estimated that 7% to 8% of the energy that is produced globally is used to lift groundwater and pump it through pipes, and to treat both groundwater and wastewater. This figure rises to around 40% in developed countries.

Over 24% percent of energy consumed by industrial motors are consumed by pumps (see Figure 1).  The energy crisis is a major driver in pushing the industry to develop new energy efficient pumps.  Agencies like EuroPump and AHR are defining many standards to ensure energy efficient pumps.

Figure 2: Energy consumed by Industrial motors

Figure 1: Energy consumed by Industrial motors

Figure 2 illustrates potential energy savings that exist by running energy efficient pumps:

Figure 3: Major source of potential energy savings

Figure 2: Major source of potential energy savings

4 steps to integrating sustainability and energy management

The answer to meet challenges mentioned above is Intelligent Pumping systems. An intelligent pumping system is a pumping system that has the ability to regulate and control flow or pressure with major advantages of energy savings, lifetime improvements and system cost reductions.

According to EuroPump, all the pump systems should be compliant to “Euro Design” according to the Regulation (EU) No 547/2012 Ecodesign requirements for Water Pumps. Ecodesgin suggest considering the pumping system as whole system inclduing the pumps, drives, controlling systems and electrical systems.  The following figure describes the concept:

Figure 6: Extended product approach is the recommendation of EuroPump to provide energy efficient pumping systems

Figure 6: Extended product approach is the recommendation of EuroPump to provide energy efficient pumping systems

The following are the main blocks of an intelligent pumping system:

Energy Efficiency:

  1. Energy efficiency concepts: EEI, MEI,
  2. Energy efficiency is required not only for energy saving but also improved maintenance

Controllers and HMI:

  1. Concept of libraries
  2. Imbedding safety functions inside controller
  3. Improved maintenance

Drives:

  1. Initial cost vs operating cost
  2. Energy saving with drives
  3. Better protection

Pumps:

  1. Efficient pumps

Remote monitoring:

  1. Smart devices
  2. Use of cloud
  3. Maintenance

So to conclude, embarking on intelligent pumping is the answer to follow the trends and meet the challenges in a modern day pumping.

A step by step approach can bring a smooth change:

  1.  First step should be introducing Energy measuring devices in the architectures. Data from energy meters are useful not only for energy optimization but also helps the operators perform better maintenance.
  2. Use controllers with intelligent applications for better protections and reduced commissioning time while following guidelines for standard set by local and global organizations.
  3. One of the vital steps is replacing fixed speed pumps with variable speed pumps.
  4. For “smart” visibility of the pumping systems, remote monitoring for maintenance and energy efficiency should be provided.

To learn more, visit Pumping Control Solutions

9 Responses to “How “Intelligent Pumping” strategies address disruptive trends in Water Wastewater Industry”

  1. jack creamer

    Couple of insights as to why pumps represent such a significant opportunity for energy savings
    1) Pumps almost never run fully loaded 24X7, hence there is a varying duty cycle. VFDs allow the operator to take advantage of the “down cycle” to dramatically save energy due to the “affinity laws” – especially true with Centrifugal pumps
    2) It is estimated that 30-40% of all pumps are oversized, due to seveal factors – some legitimate, some not. VFDs allow the operator to compensate for oversizing and still run the pump at BEP.

    Reply
  2. Gene Cage

    Hello,
    Water is heart of international discussions on human and economic development and water security is one of the biggest global risks for the near future.
    For that, for waste water industry ,pumping equipment needs a pedigree that demonstrates robustness and reliability in this demanding heavy footfall environment.

    Thanks,
    Gene Cage,
    http://www.Water2Business.com

    Reply
    • Hussain Ahmed Hussain Ahmed

      Hello Gene,

      Thanks for your interest in our Intelligent Pumping strategies.
      With best regards
      Hussain

      Reply
  3. Mike Ashford

    Thank you for this article. Could you please share the source for these statistics?

    “It is estimated that 7% to 8% of the energy that is produced globally is used to lift groundwater and pump it through pipes, and to treat both groundwater and wastewater. This figure rises to around 40% in developed countries.”

    I have never seen such a direct and high correlation between energy consumption and water services and would like to understand more.

    Thank you.

    Reply
  4. Hussain Ahmed Hussain Ahmed

    Dear Mike,

    Thank you very much for interest and comment.

    Here are the sources of information:

    WEF (World Economic Forum). 2009. Energy Vision Update 2009: Thirsty Energy: Water and Energy
    in the 21st Century. Geneva/Englewood, Colo., WEF/Cambridge Energy Research Associates.
    http://www.weforum.org/reports/thirsty-energy-water-and-energy-21st-century?fo=1 (Accessed 30 April
    2011.)

    IEA (International Energy Agency). 2006. World Energy Outlook 2006. Paris, IEA. 2007. World Energy
    Outlook 2007. Paris, IEA.

    Reply
  5. Centrifugal pump rebuilding

    It’s true that saving the consumption of energy in possible ways is necessary with growing population. With increasing developing industries, this article is well written in reducing energy with the pumps usage.

    Reply

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